From the category archives:

Regulations

Federal and Virginia State Duck Stamps

by Staff on October 4, 2014

Duck Stamps In Virginia If you want to hunt for any kind of water birds, duck, geese etc … you will be required to first have a Federal Duck Stamp.  It will be the ‘conservation’ type that allows hunting of migratory birds.  These Duck Stamps can be found at licensed locations which include the USPS Post Offices, so that should make it convenient for you.

For one thing, it’s a law that you must have the Federal Duck Stamp and you could be on the receiving end of some major fines if caught hunting without one.  Another benefit for you is that the Duck Stamp provides you with free entry to avoid fees at some National Wildlife Refuges.  The Federal stamps is necessary for any waterfowl hunters aged 16 or more.

In addition to the Federal Stamp, Virginia also requires a Virginia Migratory Waterfowl Conservation Stamp unless they are hunting on their own private property.  The monies that they collect are used to preserve/protect waterfowl and habitat.  One more requirement: hunters of Virginia’s migratory gamebirds (like quail, woodcock etc) must also register for free at the Virginia Harvest Information Program (HIP), details in link above.

On the flip side of the Duck Stamp requirement are the artists who compete to have their waterfowl art works chosen to be featured on the Duck Stamp.  It’s a big boost to an artist’s career to be selected.  And arguably an artist has an unfair advantage by choosing a Wood Duck with its brilliant plumage … but you didn’t hear that here.  This year’s Duck Stamp winning art was done by artist Guy Crittenden, and it’s below.

Virginia Duck Stamp 2014

 

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Organic Farming 101 in Virginia

by Staff on October 1, 2014

Organic Foods in VirginiaThe US Dep’t of Agriculture has published a very convenient site for farmers who’re looking for resources and advice for successful organic farming.  The link will take you to other really helpful information about how to become Certified Organic (did you know that you could get reimbursed for some of your certification costs?) … as well as information on the definitions and standards for certification, help with setting up good conservation practices or crop insurance, among other things.

And for those of you who actually attended every class in school and never resorted to the Cliffs Notes … here’s a link to the complete Code of Regulations for Organic Foods.  Happy reading!  There will be a quiz on Monday.

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Farmers React to Central VA Gas Pipeline

by Staff September 10, 2014

Here’s another update link in the conversation about the gas pipelines that are scheduled to run through Central VA.  (For our background blogs on this subject you can click HERE.) One Augusta County farm family shares their concerns about the immediate personal impact that the pipeline land acquisition is having on their own 200-acre family [...]

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Poultry Exported to China Again

by Staff May 30, 2014

Here’s something to cluck about.   China is once again allowing Virginia poultry products to be sold to China.  For the past 7 years Virginia has been the target of a complete ban of exported poultry products because China’s Minister of Agriculture wanted to isolate a single case of avian influenza.  China was quite strict about their ban.  It also [...]

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The Humane Egg

by Staff January 31, 2014

Our neighbor raises chickens.  Happy chickens.  They run around on acres in a fenced yard, serenely pecking at worms and bugs.   We try to purchase their eggs every time we get a chance.  Those egg yolks range from bright yellow to dark yellow, and the yellows stand up at attention when the egg hits the frying [...]

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Virginia is Quarantined for Gypsy Moths

by Staff January 19, 2014

As a kid I grew up in a town that was so tiny that the town’s only doctor also served as the Medical Examiner and he was the entire local Board of Health.  He knew everyone by name, delivered most of the children, and he did house-calls for his patients.  When I had the chicken pox,  [...]

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